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You can be addicted to internet if you have

# A need for an ever increasing amount of time on the internet to achieve satisfaction or a dissatisfaction with the continued use of the same amount of time on the internet.
# Two or more withdrawal symptoms developing within days, weeks, or up to a month after a reduction or cessation of internet use. These include distress or impairment of social, personal, or occupational functioning such that there is psychological or psychomotor agitation such as anxiety, restlessness, irritability, trembling, tremors, voluntary or involuntary typing movements of the fingers, obsessive thinking, fantasies, or dreams about the internet.
# Internet engagement to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.
# Internet often accessed more often or for longer periods of time than was intended.
# A significant amount of time is spent in activities related to internet use (for example, internet surfing).
# Important social, occupational, or recreational activities eliminated or reduced due to internet use.
# Risk of loss of a significant relationship, job, educational, or career opportunity due to excessive internet use.
# Internet engagement used as a way of escaping problems or relieving feelings of guilt, helplessness, anxiety, or depression.
# Concealing from or lying to family members about the extent of internet use.
# Internet user driven to financial difficulty due to incurring unaffordable internet fees.

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